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. >> is marijuana harmful or helpful? cnn's dr. sanjay gupta cuts through the smoke on america's green rush and journeys around the world to uncover the highs and lows of weed. tomorrow night, 8:00 eastern. >>> next, major flooding across a big portion of the united states. people in 12 states are in danger of high water right now. i'll show you a wide area of the south that's already been hit and is back in the threat zone again. begins with arthritis pain... and a choice. take up to 6 tylenol in a day or just 2 aleve for all day relief. all aboard. ♪ all aboard. hi, hi, i'm sherri. and i'm going to show sherri how collecting box tops for education earns cash for our school by shopping at walmart. come on. sherri, look at all these products that you can buy for your family with box tops. and look, four box tops in one box. that's awesome! more cash for our school. only at walmart you get 4 box tops on over 100 items. karissa i got it and you only had to tell me four times. find 4 box tops on your family favorites like general mills cereals and nature valley granola bars backed by our low
-interest in america's cultural war. she writes on family, feminism, homosexuality, affirmative action and campus political correctness. she helped publish a book entitled radical and chief which was exposing obama's lost years that nobody knows
a lot because they sell a lot in north america and same with international including china. finally for gm, the important thing to focus on here is that asia is increasingly being driven by the chinese market, and they are putting more of an emphasis on china when it comes to vehicle development. it's a big change from the early 2002 to 2003 when they bought dae woo out of south korea. at that time, keep in mind, 10, 12 years ago, they had very little expertise when it came to small cars. they needed dae woo, and that's a shame and gm is looking at how can it lower its cost and the record is that they are considering lowering production there. >> thanks very much. over to josh lipton for a three market flash. >> free acquisition to tell you about beginning with dole fruit, well in the green. agreed to be taken private by chair and ceo who raised his offer and back in june he over it at $12 a share. also, pin pall foo-- pinnacle fs down. both companies are leading players in the growing field of aviation information management. tyler, back to you. >> all right, thank you very much, j
by 3.4%. it was hit by natural catastrophes, bad weather essentially, in north america. but also in europe. net profit missing expectations for the second quarter, and companies also pretty cautious about its outlook. last but not least, i want to show you what is happening in the currency space. sterling dollar at a two-month high, sitting at 155.78. getting closer and closer to that 156 level. this is on the back of better -- much stronger than expected retail sales for the month of july. certainly benefitting from that heat wave we have been seeing in the uk. euro dollar pretty resilient at 132.82, back below the 133 level. and dollar yen seeing a little bit of softness at 98.07. this is because the finance minister in japan pretty much quashed hopes of that cut in the corporate tax rate and this is what the markets had been hoping for. so we are seeing some yen strength. and on the back of that, we are seeing declines, pretty big ones, actually, in the nikkei 225. back over to you guys. >> thanks very much, carolin. becky, are you still looking? >> looking for some of these.
countries, north ameri america, northern europe. emerging markets continue to struggle. overall, again, i think we're seeing a near-term issue. but going forward, i think you're going to be really happy with this company and i think over the long term over the next year or two i think you're going see pretty solid and strong growth. >> all right, jim channing sticking with his shares. we watch them down about 7%. moving on now to major news, president obama making a statement moment ace go on egypt. he said the u.s. will cancel joint military exercises with egypt. to help us understand this, john harwood joins us live now from washington with more. john? >> kelly, it was a minimalist response by the president. you had some people including former advisers of his own saying that the united states should suspend or cut off military aid to the egyptian government. the president did not do that. he said that they were going to cancel those bright star military exercises scheduled for next month and continue to consult with his national security team on other steps. what he was trying to do wa
the samsung galaxy s 4 for only $148 on verizon - america's largest 4g lte network. walmart. >>> coming up after the 2012 election, governor bobby jindal offered this advice to his fellow party members. >> we've got to stop being the stupid party. i'm serious, it's time for a new republican party that talks like adults. >> yesterday governor chris christie did not name names, but told rnc he wasn't going to call them the stupid party and that the election is in fact over. translation, get over it, jindal. we will talk republican party cannibalism just ahead. ♪ i'm a hard, hard worker every day. ♪ ♪ i'm a hard, hard worker and i'm working every day. ♪ ♪ i'm a hard, hard worker and i'm saving all my pay. ♪ small businesses get up earlier and stay later. and to help all that hard work pay off, membership brings out millions of us on small business saturday and every day to make shopping small huge. this is what membership is. this is what membership does. humans. we are beautifully imperfect creatures living in an imperfect world. that's why liberty mutual insurance has your back,
? is this the beginning of the big correction? according to a conversation i had with mcneil curry of bank of america and merrill lynch on futures now, he's saying the yield could go as high as 3% and with that shift we'll see more volatility and potential downside for stocks. >> jackie, thank you very much. let me turn back to you, david. if i'm reading you correctly it's basically you may think that we're going to churn a little bit. may have bumpy times and basically the market will be all right. jackie just talked about some of the sectors doing well and not. if i buy your overall thesis, what sectionors do you like best right now? >> tyler, we like two sectors, tech and financials. in terms of technology, it's been a laggard this year. i think what people have maybe lost site of a little bit is that global profits have not grown in almost two years. u.s. companies have grown earnings, but outside the u.s. it's been a weaker story. that's really weighed on enterprise tech spending. as the global economy recovers we should see a better profit environment for non-u.s. companies. tech companies shou
. they basically i believe probably are looking at all the cell phone calls in america every day. also, i don't think it's good police work. i think we get overwhelmed with data. we have so much data that he we don't notice when the -- goes back to check that, his name is misspelled and we don't know he has gone back. we need more people doing specific intelligence data on people who we have suspicion of rather than doing it on suspicion list severance of all american phone calls. >> john: let me switch gears and talk to you about obama care because that is going to be a big topic of discussion when congress comes back in a couple of weeks. you support the defunding of obama care but you recently acknowledged you don't believe it will happen and get through the senate. your only leave then lever is to defund obama care. that would shut down the government which you have stated publicly you don't think is a good idea. what do you really have left here, senator? >> well, i don't think shutting down the government is a good idea. but i do think that we were elected, conservatives were elected to
there you go. we've tallied the results, and you said it, america. mike murphy, the bear on google won the debate, although you may -- >> i commend our viewers for their charitable bets. >> final trades. >> memory research. >> buy citi. >> buy apple. >> nice, 1:00 exactly. "power lunch" starts now. >> "halftime" is over. the second half of your trading day begins now. >> nailed it. 1:00 on the button. stocks are steady following last week's sell-off but there are new fears about the emerging markets. is there still opportunity out there or is your money better off here in the u.s. with tapering right around the corner? >>> a big week for retail earnings, folks. the sector is up about 25% so far this year. and we will tell you the one thing, the one thing that is defining the retail winners and losers, and it will surprise you. and may actually make you a little queasy when you find out. >>> and the wildfires out west, huge, fast-growing blaze sparking mandatory evacuations in idaho. sun valley, that is the area that is apparently most at risk out there. we are going to go there for
is destroying the starnt of living of middle class america, destroying their wages and yes, prices go up. look at oil companies. i know a lot of oil stocks and oil companies aren't making a lot of money. look at oil stock s going up. $100 a barrel is not high enough for the oil company toes economically replace depleting reserves. oil prices are much too cheap. inflation driving up the cost of exploring for oil. oil needs to be $150 to $200 a barrel for the oil companies to make decent profits. >> just saying, why is it, if you're saying oil is going to $200, do the four contract reflect an oil price lower than where we are said to? >> the consensus is wrong. wrong about a lot of things. the consensus is wrong about gold. about the bond market. remember what people thought about internet stocks in 1999? or about real estate in 2007? whmp you have a consensus, it's generally wrong. so i'm not looking at what most people think is going to happen to the price of oil. i'm looking at what i believe is going to happen to the price of oil and i think i'm a better barometer than just the consensus opi
, the islamists in syria will be emboldened, they will say this is america, turned you down again and the mother of arab states will see it as another sign of weakness and iran will be emboldened. >> let's talk about the arab league. those arab nations are not exactly taking a bold stand themselves right now. they've spoken out against the alleged chemical attack in syria, spoken out against bashar al assad but they're not ready to support any kind of military action here. what do they really want? >> the saudis and jordanians and others, their intent is to get rid of this regime. they want to see assad out and they want a tactical defeat of iran and hezbollah. they're not going to participate openly like some did like fattah in libya. one of the reasons we have this tragedy in syria is the regional powers are unable to provide the leadership, europeans on their own cannot provide leadership and because of the dithering of the obama regime, there is no leadership. everybody is waiting for an american leadership, they cannot do it on their own. >> president obama has a tough choice on syria. the
this episode illustrates two important elements in modern america politics. the first one is, the rise of a super staffer in the case of benton who as peter mentioned is is married to the granddaughter of ron paul. he's got leverage here because the fact is, mitch mcconnell, veteran u.s. senator, the senate minority leader, needs this staffer badly. because he's a bridge to rand paul and the paul universe. mitch mcconnell already has a primary opponent on the right. he cannot afford to alienate the paul world by dumping the staffer overboard he would do just that. it's a remarkable illustration of the role of a super staffer now in american politics. the other big point it illustrates, john, is this. the tea party's rise and near dominance now in the republican party. the fact that a powerful senator like mitch mcconnell, well funded, 10 million bucks in the bank, the fact he so needs the tea party on his side that he has a staffer here criticizing him on tape and he's not dumping him, tells you all you have to know about the role in today's gop of the tea party. >> ross, let me ask yo
2012, obama versus romney and the future of elections in america." the pendulum is swinging in the republican party now. as the party moves hard right, will they really try another establishment time like romney or dole or mccain or christie or jeb bush? or will the party go for one of its tea party heroes like rand paul? here with me now is the author of the great book "collision 2016." dan, let's talk about what you call the subterranean campaign of 2012 and what it offers us in the future. >> we think of the campaign as the campaign we all cover all the time. everything we talk about, every utterance, every gaffe, every debate, every movement. and that's part of politics and in many ways the interesting and enjoyable part of politics, but it's not necessarily the decisive part of politics. there are important and powerful underlying forces that effect every campaign. in 2012, one was the economy. would it be just good enough to allow president obama to win re-election or bad enough to deny re-election. another was voter anger. which direction would it go? a third was the
's just pulled over the man acquitted in one of america's most controversial trials in years. the shooting death of trayvon martin. >> nowhere in particular. >> nowhere in particular? why do you say that? >> you didn't see my name? >> huh? >> you didn't see my name? >> na-uh. what a coincidence. >> reporter: in the two weeks following the florida jury's verdict -- >> not guilty. >> reporter: -- zimmerman had been in hiding. his legal team tells abc news he's apparently on a road trip and also posted on twitter, "for his safety, we won't make any comments about zimmerman's whereabouts, and we will work to protect his privacy. with his conceal and carry permit reinstated, it is legal for the 29-year-old to transport a weapon in most states including texas. what he can't do is speed. zimmerman's brother tweeted "a heavy foot, nothing more. and this officer gave him a break." >> this is a warning for your speed. >> reporter: brandy hitt, abc news, los angeles. >>> today sentencing in cleveland for ariel castro the man charged with kidnapping and torturing three women. he's pled guilty to 937 c
. and if they dorvisor no, that's important to america's safety and security so what is that this one action you take at that point? >> first i would like to see a source with training and education. we have put together office of training and workforce engagement a very robust, ethics and integrity training program. and also a training program for entire workforce. because that's a we get to an efficient workforce in future, high-performance workforce. we have put together a very substantial required training that all tsos have to go through. >> how do you train -- i'm baffled. how to train one to know to call their supervisor and tell him i'm not going to be a work or i may be late? >> it is commonsense. and i would tell you that we have ethics training. we have integrity training. we have situational training on videos for our people. we're trying to train a workforce of about 47,000 screeners, and they have to do the job and have to be trained. they get in on an annual basis. we distrusted it would but messages. i want to you on the issue of tardiness, you're right. i'm not going to disagree with
the contents of vast amounts of america's emails and text communications in and out of the country hunting for people who mention information about foreigners under surveillance. while it has long known that the agency conducts searches, this reveals more about the scale of secret operations. government officials say it was authorized by the fisa amendment act which congress approved eavesdropping as long as it was a non-citizen abroad. it gets a little in the weeds for me. >> i know. stephanie: i mean, that's what's -- as we've said, jim, it's not that i don't have concerns about it, i think that's why it's not that understandable for the normal person to go i don't know what degree they're doing what exactly. >> exactly, and that's what's so troubling about it, that it's just a broad, you know, drag net. stephanie: yeah. you know what will make us feel better? maggot on fax. hi, bob. that would be a stretch to call any fax about maggots fun, but go ahead. >> they are very handy for eating dead flesh. you have a piece of flesh that's dead on your body that's rotting, doctors, american doc
the best shot they have. i am going to keep this the safest large city in america, and i am going to do it while ending unconstitutional stop and frisk. i am going to use the power of our neighborhoods for economic development to bring good jobs in every neighborhood, particularly those neighborhoods that have been left behind. i am going to take head on the affordability crisis. people cannot find homes and apartments they can't afford, so i am going to make sure we build more affordable housing, improve the housing authority, and get new york city over its own rent law. we are the greatest city of the world, and we can be even greater when we create more opportunity for folks to move into the middle class. that is what i have done my entire career, delivered for new york, and that is what i am going to do for mayor, and i ask for your vote tonight. thank you. applause]d >> mr. liu. >> i am an unlikely candidate for mayor, getting my degree in physics, spending most of my adult career outside of governmental politics, but i entered politics because i wanted to see a change creates i wa
: every day more americans choose abc news, america's number one n it makes me feel happy and excited because i have a mentor in my life. it makes me feel good because i know i am helping someone. the first time i seen her smile, i knew it was gonna be a better year and a better day. she has changed my life, now i can be whatever i want to. she taught me never to give up, and i never will. mentoring works, become a mentor. >>> this morning on "world news now" -- moral obscenity. that's what the secretary of state is calling syria's alleged use of deadly chemical weapons. could the u.s. be on the brink of taking military action? >> fierce fire fight. monstrous storm of flames burning to yosemite national forest. the race to stop the fire from destroying ancient trees and polluting drinking water supplies. >> we never know the way the fires come up around here when they're going to overtake you. so safety first. >> a progress report as 4,000 homes and businesses are in harm's way. >> then watch out increased risk of walking while texting and talking on the phone. a killer combination. >
announcer ] good choice business pro. good choice. national. official partner of the pga of america. the healthcare law gives us powerful tools to fight it... to investigate it... ...prosecute it... and stop criminals. our senior medicare patrol volunteers... are teaching seniors across the country... ...to stop, spot, and report fraud. you can help. guard your medicare card. don't give out your card number over the phone. call to report any suspected fraud. we're cracking down on medicare fraud. let's make medicare stronger for all of us. ♪ the middle of this special moment and i need to run off to the bathroom. ♪ i'm fed up with always having to put my bladder's needs ahead of my daughter. ♪ so today, i'm finally talking to my doctor about overactive bladder symptoms. [ female announcer ] know that gotta go feeling? ask your doctor about prescription toviaz. one toviaz pill a day significantly reduces sudden urges and accidents, for 24 hours. if you have certain stomach problems or glaucoma, or can not empty your bladder, you should not take toviaz. get emergency medical hel
. that is the precursor to what is today macy's. >>> america's farming industry going through a major transition and that could open up bigger opportunities for individuals to invest in farm land. here now to tell us about the risks and rewards about farm land investing is john taylor, at u.s. trust. thank you for coming in today. >> thank you for having me. >> we should set the stage a little bit for why we're at this position. why you might need investors to come in to what used to be family farms. a lot more expensive to be a family farmer and have to be able to have a much bigger land parcel, correct? >> that's right. if you look at the most recent usda report, based on the census they did in 2007, you have farmers who are 65 and older and another 32% 55 and 65, so you kind of add it all up. >> 65% of the farmers. >> 65% of farmers are 5 ye5 yea and older. that's in transition over the next 10, 15 years. you need the next generation of america's farmers on the land. >> is it tougher to get younger people these days to do this? >> in a lot of ways, kids went off to college and they may have g
america, you had no idea. it angers me because there's a responsibility there to the people investing in these companies, listed on that exchange, and, you know, to make sure they're aware of exactly what was going on. and they were left out. >> i think in fairness to greifeld it would be a question of priorities in his view. probably you have a relatively small team, the job has got to be to ensure that financially nobody gets hurt rather than appearing on cable television i think is the point he's trying to make. >> no question. i absolutely agree with that. i'm not saying that. i'm saying if you're sitting in the middle of the country you have no idea what's locked up and why. the press is the only conduit of information to you. i would say that we had an issue with facebook. we had an issue with the flash crash. we had an issue yesterday with what occurred on the nasdaq, technological issue. what i have an issue with is how it's communiqued to the public and how mom and pop in middle america are actually going to get informed on that and they should be informed because they're the
's happening. >> right? it's happening in america. a sad commentary. >> you know what, i saw it on andrew's face. >> depressing. >> why? we have al accomplished so much. >> depressing. >> look at the deficit reduction ha has occurred over the last three years. take it forward. it's 4 trillion over ten years. 4 trillion over ten years. >> you like it. jimmy likes it. yoep i don't understand it. >> the process is ugly. at the end of the day, we actually accomplished something. >> it's good, jimmy? >> 1.4 trillion when bush left office? today 643 billion. that's the number. >> is that good? i think it's fantastic. we should get below 500 billion. should put us where we were before the bush -- >> joe. >> i don't think the white house nodes to unsettle markets any more than they are unsettled. lock at the economy,ist very weak. a lot of underlying weak inside in the economy. why do we need this? there ought to be a negotiation, a discussion. we ought to have a chance to avoid the disaster let's go back to two years ago, i was luxuriously sitting on nan tuvenlth i had to leave to fly back to ne
desire is not to get america into a third middle eastern conflict. but he had gone out and said himself that if the syrian regime used chemical weapons that would be considered a red line. once he put himself out there, i think it was difficult for him given the gravity of this attack, a truly horrendous attack with chemical weapons for him to do nothing. >> ironically, quick take, does russia saying don't do this help the chances that it doesn't have to be a military response? >> no, but my guess would be we're trying to send a message to the russian this is is going to be a limited strike. we're not trying to overthrow assad and that will lead their response to not be that severe. >> peter beinart thank you for the insight. >>> let's turn to dangerous weather at home, the fierce wildfire burning in and around yosemite national park showing no signs of letting up and it's threatening san francisco's water supply and power grid. the rim fire burned through almost 161,000 acres so far, the 13th largest wildfire inle kaical history. cnn's nick valencia is live in groveland, california, tr
. their time. it was bank of america's time before and now it is one of the moments when i look back at my own career and i realize that i had a choice, goldman sachs coming out of harvard law or paul weiss. i took goldman, but it is a paul weiss moment. law firm. i'm going law firm. >> you covered a lot of this when you talked to jamie here on the very floor a few weeks ago. >> yes. >> take a look at this bite. >> this company did great through the crisis, and we trade around the world and trade tr trillions of dollars everyday. we are a good company with flaws. >> you are used past tense. >> yes, there is some compliance and some mortgage and some industry-wide and some unique to us, ap when nd when we looked ae said they were accurate complaints. so we acknowledge the faults and we will fix them. we are not denying it, and we will fix them and make the regulators happy with what we are doing. >> look, a lot of blame to go around and a lot of people hate the bankers, and do you read the store ri and say, boy, i feel bad for jpmorgan and dimon, wow, what a shame. no, you don't. they are big t
the field. the humiliating public verdict playing out before all of america. >>> and oprah reportedly reaching out to lindsay lohan just hours before the embattled star was going to take off for a european vacation. the queen of talk steps in. "newsroom" starts now. >>> good morning, i'm brianna keeler in for carol costello. and a small pennsylvania community that provided itself on never being in the headlines is finding itself in the middle of a tragic story this morning. police say a man with an 18-year-old grudge against ross township officials killed three people at a town council meeting in pennsylvania last night. this is about 70 miles north of philadelphia, and witnesses say that rockne newell started firing even before he entered the building. once inside, the gunman sprayed more bullets, then left and came back with another gun. the nightmare didn't stop until he was tackled and shot. >> they absolutely would have saved lives. he was entering the building again with a handgun and certainly his intent had been shown that he was wanting to harm the people and certainly if the
develop it. they bought it. $300 million gets you $10 billion. >> awesome. >> welcome to america. >>> now to the markets. and the week ahead. director of fx strategy at bks management and bob ruska is fao economics chief economist. bob, i used to worry that, you know, everything's supposed to just go perfectly according to schedule for the fed to start tapering. and helle is going to be on saying we're going from three years to 3%. you're not sure it's a slam dunk that things keep improving. you think housing looks weak and there's other numbers that aren't cooperating with the fed in terms of showing that we're getting above stall speed. >> the backtrack and new home sales last week was unexpected. it was severe. and it was widespread. and, of course, because new home sales are listed at the time you sign the contract, whereas existing home sales don't get posted until after you close the deal, you see the impact of interest rates and new home sales -- >> you already see it. >> and so yeah. you saw this big decline. and you also saw that average home prices continue to go up or median ho
of america, can i ask you about that industry? obviously the billionaires are advancing on individual titles. you see bezos with "the washington post." the koch brothers may be coming in. warren buffett has been advancing into newspapers. what's the future of the industry in the country. i know you've done studies of how revenue streams ever changing. will it be as strong as it is in two decades? >> it's tremendous you're getting the interest in the investment from very savvy, very smart people from multiple backgrounds. the entire media landscape absolutely is transitioning. digital is changing the way all of us interact with media. i believe that newspapers are uniquely well positioned to take advantage of that transformation. we have unique content whether it's an opportunity newspaper who is covering an event, a sports event, city council that no one else covers, or a national or global brand like "the washington post," like "the new york times." the amount of unique, original content generated by newspapers surpasses any other media and whether it's delivered in print, in digital, onlin
and they're shouting at us, australia, with the guns to our heads, we shouted back, no, america, america. i had thrown my passport at them. i was born here in washington, dc and they would kick me in my stomach and as others joined the firing squad i would say, america, america. at some point they took the guns from our heads, we believe because we were from the same country their weapons were from. they would have to pay a price for killing us they never had to pay for killing the timor yeast, a red cross jeep pulled up. we were able to get into it. the driver of the red cross jeep picked up the timorees man who was in a sewer ditch next to us and everytime the soldiers beat him, he would put up his hands in the prayer sign and they would smash the butts of their rifles into this face. we drove as a museum -- human mass to to the hospital. at the hospital, when we got out, the doctors and nurses started to cry when they saw us. ... people can march in streets here, and they saw that that day. and that deepened their despair. we went hiding. we knew we had to get out of the country. we have
them more resources. whether time he got down to hometown america, that was being bounced a bit. we held those others to a higher standard. the one third that was in the bottom all the time, usually it was our divisional units, you created a mindset that that is all they expect of us, that is where we are going to stay, and then we have 180 days to get ready to go. one of the best things the army did was adopt the rotation of the oxygen model. it has done so much for every functional area within the guard. not just with on that forces but all the enablers. everyone is in the cycle. i love that model. everybody does need a break. my option is we continue in that cycle. find out what the right amount is for the different functions. >> i think there is absolutely more room for operational forces and then more strategic forces in the navy reserve. we see that was seabees involved in rotation, squadrons who are operational, and yet there needs to be room in the reserve for people who can only do 38 days per year. people who can do the 12 months, 12 weekends, and 14 days. that is basicall
of america. he knew what japan was getting into and as he told the individual at the time, he said that we could guarantee a tough fight for the first six months but i have no confidence after that. it is important to know that he is a gambler. he played billiards and roulette and dejong and it almost did not matter what the game was as long as it had a gambling component. he often threatened to resign to become a full-time professional gambler. that is how good he was. although i'm sure they didn't take his threats seriously, it is important to understand that his love of gambling affected his military strategy and influenced his thinking. that is why he has a mixed record. he was a fascinating character, nonetheless. when he was young and serving aboard japan's naval flagship during the japanese and russian war, the deck bluff and he was severely injured by an explosion. if you look at this photograph here, you can see the stars peppering his face from the shrapnel. he was pretty self conscious, which is one reason they were often airbrushed out of his official photographs and he also lo
Search Results 350 to 383 of about 384 (some duplicates have been removed)

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